How Much Exercise Does a Dog Need?

How much exercise your dog needs depends on their Breed, Age and Health. Generally speaking a walk around the park is not going to cut it. Monitor the each dog individually.

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BREED

The following is a list of breeds that are at risk for being overweight or obese;

Cairn Terriers

West Highland Terriers

Scottish Terriers

Shetland Sheepdogs

Basset Hounds

Cavalier King Spaniels

Dachshunds

Beagles

Cocker Spaniels

Labrador Retrievers

SMALL BREEDS

Small breeds, despite popular belief, don’t get enough exercise just running around the house. Having said that, small dogs should not be asked to run with an adult for long extended times. The small dogs have short legs and are required to do a lot more extra steps. Remember dog will likely get tired before human. Canine Fitness Classes are perfect for those small breeds trying to get their exercise in, because class can be designed where humans do the majority of the exercise. Circuit Training Classes and Stretching with Spot Classes are highly recommended for small breeds!

SPORT BREEDS

Those sports breeds, which were designed to hunt all day, require a ton of exercise. Active breeds need a minimum of 30 minutes of hard aerobic exercise most days of the week preferably daily. Canine Fitness Classes are perfect for those active breeds to get their exercise in. All of the Canine Fitness Classes are recommended for these rambunctious breeds!

SHORT NOSE BREEDS/BRADYCEPHALIC BREEDS

Breeds with short noses such as pugs, bulldogs or boxers have trouble breathing when exercised vigorously. Due to being able to adapt with the exercise equipment, Canine Fitness classes are perfect for these types of breeds. Circuit Training Classes and Stretching with Spot Classes are recommended for these short nose breeds.

BIG BREEDS

Big breeds of any age sustained jogging and running is too hard on their joints. They are better built for strength building and short cardio. Canine Fitness classes are perfect for these giant teddy bears. Circuit Training Classes, Stretching with Spot and Snowshoeing with Scruffy classes are all recommended!

AGE

PUPPIES

Puppies require a lot more exercise than when they are around middle age to senior years. It is important that puppies should not be expected to run with an adult for extended periods of time, as it can affect their joints, because they are still developing. Not only do Canine Fitness Classes adapt their equipment for those puppies, the puppies gain socialization skills from the classes too! Canine Circuit Training & Stretching with Spot are great classes to take not only to keep puppies safely fit but also socialize them to new textures.

ADOLESCENT DOGS

Most dogs get abandoned at shelters between the ages of 8-18 months old. Adolescent dogs want to explore their world and test their own abilities in ways you wont always like. During this age they have a ton of energy and it needs to be met with a ton of exercise. Most adolescent dogs might have the energy to outrun you. Canine Fitness classes not only physically tire dogs; they also mentally wear out the dogs. A tired dog is a calm dog. All of the Canine Fitness Classes are recommended for these rambunctious and challenging dogs.

SENIOR DOGS

Geriatric dogs still need exercise, just shorter time frames or less intense exercises than they used to. An older dog as much as they would like to keep up with you, they should not be subjected to rigorous workouts. Exercise stimulates tissues as it increases blood flow. Tissues become oxygenated and toxins are removed from them more readily. In addition exercise helps bowel function enormously. This is especially important in older adults. Inside your aging pet, metabolism is slowing, organ function, (including brain function) is slowing and the response to disease via the immune system is not what it when like when the dog was younger. An older dog should not be subjected to rigorous workouts. In Canine Fitness we adapt the fitness equipment to suit the aging canine. Circuit Training Classes & Stretching with Spot classes are perfect for those senior dogs, as we can alter the exercise plan to accommodate our aging friends.

HEALTH

HEART DISEASE

Dogs with heart disease-may tire easily and become weak sooner. The goal is to allow them to do enough exercise to enjoy themselves but not do so much exercise that they get into trouble. Animals with significant heart disease should not be pushed to exercise beyond their limits. Stretching with Spot are great classes for those dogs suffering from heart disease, as it teaches not only a bond between human and dog, but also teaches dog core strength.

DIABETES

Exercise can have a dramatic effect on blood sugar levels. In humans with type 2 diabetes, exercise can lower blood sugars so effectively that patents who exercise regularly can reduce their need for added insulin.

For dogs exercise can have a similar effect. Exercise utilizes energy and helps to avoid elevated blood sugar levels. In addition, the increased blood flow produced by exercise may improve insulin absorption helping to further lower the blood glucose concentration. That said the wrong kind of too much exercise can cause blood sugar levels to drop quickly.

Proper exercise can help manage the disease while keeping your dog fit and as healthy as possible.

  1. Talk to your vet about exercise imitations for your dog. Make sure to ask them for clearance on the types of exercises that your dog prefers.
  2. Keep a regular consistent exercise routine including the type and duration of activity and time of day that the activity occurs.
  3. No weekend warriors allowed. Keep the plan consistent.
  4. Avoid exercises that increase the risk of wounds. Because diabetics are at risk for non-healing wounds and infections, avoid activities that place them at risk for cuts and scrapes
  5. Circuit Training Classes and Stretching with Spot are great for these dogs to go at their own pace.

How much exercise your dog needs depends on the Breed, Age and Health. Generally speaking a walk around the park is not going to cut it. Most dogs are going to need 30-60 minutes of exercise a day. We always recommend speaking with your Veterinarian to get a more in depth idea of what should and should not be done with your canine when exercising. This is part of the reason why we get the Canine Health Evaluation form filled out.

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